GHC

An Experience for My Education

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reBlogged from Amplify

My dearly beloved late mother desired that I should become a medical doctor. As it were, I gravitated to computers instead. In my short professional career, I have found my place using computers — and information systems — to improve health outcomes. From the linux based African access point, to becoming part of the Uganda EMR Society, I have marveled at the way information technology is utilized in the Ugandan health system. Suffice it to say, progress has been slower than my liking. But that’s another story.

When I realised I would not attend medical school, I decided that I would pursue something closely connected. A computer science graduate, my work experience experience has spanned Netmark Nigeria household surveys to telling the story of pediatric HIV in Uganda. Along this journey, my colleagues have included architects, designers, communications specialists, and data scientists, to name a few.

Find the rest of this post on GHC’s Amplify publication.

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The GHC Alumni Agenda

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The Global Health movement has grown beyond its earliest ideals, encompassing professionals of all manner and kind. The reality of Ebola, today, shows us that all of us, undeniably, play a part in the health of our communities. No-longer can we blame cultural practices, or hide behind the hope of miraculous signs and wonders – today, we all actively take part in the shape and form of our health. Or God forbid, we die.

The GHC Model takes a young and passionate generation of global health enthusiasts and places them at the forefront of health care, in deserving communities. For 1 year, I served as a fellow, I learned, I grew and now I am a sold out advocate. But the journey for health equity is a journey of a lifetime. GHC has launched Alumni programs across the 2 continents, to keep the candle burning.

Fellows, Alumni and Friends, today, I present to you the GHC Alumni Agenda.

Alumni are critical to the mission of mobilizing a community of emerging leaders to build the movement for health equity. 6 years after the first class, there are now more alumni than fellows. Alums are unique because after the fellowship, they are blown by winds further and in more industries than GHC could have managed to place them. While there, their collective experiences can still be harnessed towards improving the health of those most in need, both in their own countries and beyond. GHC is committed to supporting alumni in their leadership development and involvement in the global health equity movement.

The alumni program is guided by GHC’s leadership practices and framework that integrates professional development, interior formation and intellectual formation within the context of the self, world and community. GHC believes that leadership qualities and skills crucial to achieving social change and progress in global health are not innate and require regular attention and practice.

GHC leaders (Fellows and Alumni) are agents of change who: Are committed to social justice; Collaborate;  Inspire and mobilize others; Adapt and innovate; Are self-aware and committed to learning;  and Get results.

To date, Alumni Committees have been established in all countries where GHC has fellows. It is the role of the Alumni Committee, facilitated by the GHC Program Manager in that country, to determine the priority activities and approaches for the year. This strategy should reflect strategies that reflect on GHC’s vision of movement building and in particular, goals for the alumni program and our approach to leadership development.

We have ambitious plans, to hold a sports gala for our placement organisations, and a hackathon to solve pressing needs for KCCA. We also plan to support each other in personal endeavors. We will expand the annual East Africa alumni retreat in January 2015, as well as supporting the recruitment of new GHC fellows

Similar to GHC’s fellowship programming, the Uganda Alumni committee would like to achieve the following objectives for Alumni and fellows:

Knowledge Sharing and Communications – We would like to see alumni interact with each other in ways that sharpen one another, including targeted workshop sessions. Alumni  should tap into each other’s wealth of experience and knowledge in health and development and allow for greater information sharing and collective wisdom.

Community Building and Networking: We hope that Alumni achieve the objective of remaining plugged and connected post-fellowship. We will enjoy our company as well as that of new partnerships and relationships. We will encourage networking opportunities and even work/project collaborations. We will support GHC recruitment for new fellow classes, because we would like to add the best to our community.

Professional Development: Even as Alumni, we hope that you continue to prioritize skills development and the sharing of professional resources to allow alums to better perform in their jobs and open the doors to new opportunities. Moreover, Alums are already signed up to support fellows, as part of the mentor-ship program.

Accompaniment/Self-care: As members of the Global Health Corps community, we live out our values through our behavior and our dealings with others. We transcend ourselves and our immediate identity as we expand our circle of care and concern to include our organizations, our fellow corps members and, last but not least, the very communities we are called to serve in throughout our careers.

I encourage the Global Health Corp Alumni to support the Alumni country program. Together, we continue to achieve the dream for health equity and social justice.

Men Can Help Stop The Spread of HIV to Infants and Children

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Together with GHC CEO, Barbara Bush, find out how Men can help STOP the spread of HIV to Infants and Children: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/barbara-bush/how-can-men-help-stop-the_b_5862200.html

My Speech to the GHC Uganda Community – 19th July 2014

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I knew I wanted to work with computers from as early as Senior 2, and I wasn’t contented with pioneering the computer club at my high school. Out of University my first job was far from computers, it was with children, orphaned children. They were singing their way to donations, inspiring people from other continents to provide for their needs. Those were the first seeds sowed against social injustice.

I was raised as a middle child, indeed my mother confessed to remembering me long when my diaper was leaking. Single mother, a house wife, I grew up in 7 suburbs in this city, and never in our own home. Those were the second seeds of consciousness to social injustice.

When I stopped looking after children, I was opened up to the world of health information systems – there I saw numbers. 327 HIV positive mothers; 45 malaria cases; any number you can name, we probably have a health statistic for it. On a computer screen, they are numbers, but in the field, they are people. Children, Mothers, Fathers – wasting away because there are no drugs; alas, there are no medical professionals to attend to them.

Now I couldn’t go back – it was not just a 3rd seed sown, it was time to be part of the solution.

We know that for people like me, ICT professionals, opportunities for us are scarce because our backgrounds are outside of healthcare. How do I use my unique skills in global health? At the same time, for those who work in traditional health fields, a lack of community with people (and professions) like mine limits collaboration, knowledge sharing and support.

GHC believes that a global movement of individuals and organizations fighting for improved health outcomes and access to healthcare for the poor is necessary in order to change the unacceptable status quo of extreme inequity.

GHC provides opportunities for young professionals from diverse backgrounds to work on the frontlines of the fight for global health equity.

In 2008, the Ministry of Health estimated that abortion-related causes accounted for 26% of all maternal mortality. This proportion is considerably higher than the World Health Organization’s estimate for Eastern Africa (18%)

In 2011, Uganda had a maternal mortality ratio of 438 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births—well above the average of 240 per 100,000 among all developing countries. Many of these were unsafe abortions. [1]According to a survey of 1,338 women who received post-abortion care at 27 health facilities, on average, Ugandan women paid 59,600 shillings (US$23) for their abortion procedure and any treatment received prior to arriving at a health facility.

If you have lived in this city most recently, you may be familiar with civil servants who “erroneously” earn 96 million shillings a month (that’s about: $35500/mo; $222/hr), and you may have heard that our development partners are redirecting aid, and in some cases it will make the difference between a pregnant mother being tested for HIV and placed on option B+ or not… literary affecting our national dream for an HIV free generation.

[2]In 2012, an estimated 168,000 women in Sub-Saharan Africa died from pregnancy and birth-related causes; 62,000 of these women did not want to become pregnant in the first place. Fully meeting all need for modern contraceptive methods would have prevented 48,000 of these deaths—a 29% decline in maternal mortality.

[3]Every shilling spent on family planning/Contraception will save more than 6 shillings in post-abortion care services averted. The cost of providing contraception in Uganda for one year has been estimated at around UGX 57200/= per user, while the overall cost per case for treating post-abortion complications is UGX 340,600/=.

 96 million shillings would provide 1678 Ugandan women a year’s needs for contraception. What else can it do now?

[The entire stipend needed for all of us 65 fellows this month!]

In this room, there are young professionals from all walks of life. You are here because you decided to be available for the Global health Movement. Something tagged at your heart and you answered the call. I challenge you, stay at your post. Remain present, remain engaged, and remain plugged. It is young people like you who are going to make a difference in the way we think about the future of this continent.

There are also partners, and the organizations where new fellows are going to be placed – you have made available room and board, time and space to tap into the passion in this room. I urge you, open up more doors; there are a lot of young unemployed (and indeed unchallenged) graduates who are willing to get their hands dirty. GHC has proved it, because the growth remains visible, next year, there will be more than 150 fellows!

Where do we go from here? This is Step #6 in how GHC Works: Fellows collaborate, Grow as leaders, Deepen Impact BEYOND the fellowship year.

Let’s see, my good friend Edward heads to Mbale to serve local communities with microfinance, as the country director for Spark MicroGrants; Cassandra has left Kyangwali Refugee community for medical school in the US – she’ll become a doctor soon enough. Brian? I will lead a team of ICT professionals – you can guess how they will turn out in a year – Global Health advocates! Many of us are going to do different things.

But oh how we are changed. How the fellowship has given us new eyes, I will never look at a health stat and not imagine the people represented; I will never lose consciousness of the health challenges of my community. I have not just grown professionally – learning what PMTCT is and the technical language around HIV and AIDS, I have also been intellectually stretched, when debating interventions for young people, and debating with my class about aid cuts and their impact on health. These discussions have made me grow, but perhaps more profoundly, I now question my own values, ethics, and motivations for engaging in this movement.

Joan, go and be a star! Brian, one year from now, you will be more than just a world changer. Sam, there is room for ICT professionals like you and me in the movement for Global Health Equity!

You and I, all of us have got to remember, we are part of a global community of emerging leaders to build the movement for health equity. We are building a community of change-makers who share a common belief: Health is a human right.

Once a Fellow, always a fellow!

Thank you.

 

[1]Sundaram A et al., Documenting the individual- and household-level cost of unsafe abortion in Uganda, International Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, 2013, 39(4):174–184

[2] Adding It Up: Costs and Benefits of Contraceptive Services—Estimates for 2012, New York: Guttmacher Institute and United Nations Population Fund, 2012.

[3] Vlassoff M et al., The health system cost of post-abortion care in Uganda, Health Policy and Planning, 2014, Vol. 29, pp. 56–66

Moving On…

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Its been a very exciting year, working as a Global Health Corp. When i joined, i wanted to bring my passion for Health and ICTs close together, and to experience the world of Global Health. What does it really mean to be part of a global health movement? I am still learning.

At the GHC institute in Yale, I face 2 men – 2 gay men, 2 HIV positive gay men – and they communicated to me. 9 months later, my government passed the anti-gay law, and it makes it criminal for these men to step on the soils of my motherland to communicate to young people, like me about what it means to be the poster child for an AIDS epidemic, and how to overcome all odds to create a movement.

In South Western Uganda, I learned about Ariel Clubs, groups of young people who are HIV positive. And i learned to listen to them as they told me stories of how they learned about their HIV status. and how they have managed since. They are vibrant, they are confident and they are a force to reckon with. They are a movement. And then 3 weeks ago, my government passed a bill that will effectively keep away every young person who doesn’t already know their status. because, knowing your status can now be a precondition for going to jail, depending on how your life pans out.

In working around HIV and AIDS, I have learned lots of things – some I knew, some are new. But I have observed and learned that there is a scarcity of health workers in the HIV/AIDS Clinics in public health facilities. There are a few, who brave the long lines of patients, who sit in on trainings and learn about the latest treatment guidelines, and they go down to the nearest HC III and begin to implement these. And then, a nurse gets sent to jail for a needle stick injury – her major undoing being that she is HIV positive. The victim on the accident was placed on PEP and has remained negative, and indeed, her professional mistakes were not excusable, but neither did the professional council prevail over her and her employer, instead, criminal law was called upon. With a national prevalence of over 7%, are we going to hire only HIV negative health workers? I wonder. And what do we make of the movement of peer educators who are part of the system for care and follow-up of HIV patients across the country?

I am a Global Health Corp – once a fellow, always a fellow!

I may be winding up the fellowship, but my consciousness of the health challenges around me is not waning. There’s Tobacco to deal with (and how young people in Bushenyi leave school to go pluck leaves, effectively turning themselves into MARPs on pay-day); and we now know that TB and HIV are such a deadly mix.

There is the road menace we have invented – number of Boda Boda related accidents! So many young people, in the prime of their lives, are screeched to a near-death experience on these 2 wheelers. Rules dont seem to work, maybe we start a movement!

There is Female Genital Mutilation in Eastern Uganda – as a father of girls, this shakes me to the core every time i think about it. Yet, many school girls still face the barbaric act.

How about Teenage pregnancies? And the unmet need for family planning. How about Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights knowledge gaps? Or the increasing consumption of drugs among the young male populations in Uganda’s urban communities.

What about you – when did you last test for HIV? If you are sexually active, do you use protection? Ladies, what is your smart choice, to prevent an unwanted pregnancy? Mothers, have you given your under 5s the gift of a complete immunization?

Finally, Are you part of a Glocal Health Movement?

Global Health and Open Source

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(First Published on Global Health Corps – Blog)

In the world of software, your best bet is open source software – usually – because, it comes free, has been developed by a community, and everyone working on it, depends on everyone else to review what they are doing to make it better. You tend to get the most original ideas, refined by the most creative minds, who have the most nobel motivations. Even if you have been living under a rock, you have heard of the popular Open Source Operating Systems (Ubuntu, RedHat, CENTOs), Office Suites (LibreOffice and OpenOffice), Mobile OS (Android) and some of the coolest tools in the technology world today (Linux Core, Apache, PHP, BIND.

If you have sent an email before, there is a very strong likelihood you used one of the 70% Servers running Apache. And you are reading this, most likely, because DNS is working fine, for you to get from your local subnet onto the internet.

At the core of it, these cool tools are developed using the “open source model” –  open source as a development model promotes:

  • Universal access via free license to a product’s design or blueprint, and
  • Universal redistribution of that design or blueprint, including subsequent improvements to it by anyone

A more academic definition of Free Software is: “Free software” is a matter of liberty, not price. To understand the concept, you should think of “free” as in “free speech”, not as in “free beer”. (Source) Freedom 1 (the second) has a precondition, to have access to the source code – that makes it opensource.

But is there such a thing as open source, outside of software?

osdc_520x292_opensourcedoctor

Yes. We can engage aspects of life – all of life –  “the open source way”.

Imagine a global understanding towards expressing a desire and willingness to share, to collaborate with others transparently. Imagine an understanding where failure is seen as a means to improve, and where all of us are constantly looking to improve. Where we go out of our way to make others better at what they are doing.

For the last 9 months, I took a break from the confines of the server room, to join the Global Health Corps. I feel like GHC, in many ways, is open-sourcing a new kind of work force to fight global health inequalities. ICT experts, architects, accountants, public health specialists, fresh graduates, you name it – all of us can contribute to the global health equity movement. The solutions are no-longer churned out only in medical school, they are traversing the globe in all sorts of shapes and forms and careers.

This is the very core of the post 2015 agenda. The Sustainable Development Goal proposed for Health is – Achieve Health
and Well-being At All Ages – To achieve this Universal Health Coverage, there are 4 underlying principles to think about:

  1. The Life Course Approach
  2. Primary Health Care a Priority
  3. Action on Determinants Through Multi-sectoral Initiatives

The 3rd one is critical to the future of health care. We cannot leave the future of our health care to only “medical experts”. We all need to roll up our sleeves and dive in.

Household Sanitation is not going to be the preserve of the Village Health Team, that is yours to deal with, that;s for you to teach the little ones. Out-of-pocket spending on health care, as a measure of household incomes – that is for health economists and policy analysts to decipher. Drug stocks, lets get managers into health facilities to streamline business processes to near perfection, and lets get more doctors into the labour suite – no mother should die while delivering, let alone, without the hands of a skilled health worker. And lets get Architects to build ‘healthy’ buildings; accounts, to manage facility and sector grants.

Lets get you to find how you can be a part of this process, and when we all curve out our niche, lets do it the open source way.

The Open Source way means we all commit to play an active role in improving the world, which is possible only when everyone has access to the way that world is designed. The world is broken in many places, but, together, we can all design the best parts of the world, and open source them to the utmost end of the world.

The world is full of “source code”—best practices, blueprints, guidelines, recipes, rules —that shape the way we think and act in it. I believe this underlying source code (whatever its form) should be open, accessible, and share-able!

Now.

 

There’s Hope…

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Yesterday I met 11-year old Ainamanige Collins. Distraught and visibly bothered, Collins is one of the children who turned up at an Ariel Club meeting. Ariel was a child of Elizabeth Glaser, who passed away while young because the world had not thought about Pediatric medication for HIV Positive Children. Ariel clubs are meetings specially arranged for HIV positive children, where they meet peers, get medication refills, get their CD4 Counts done and generally have fun, despite their medical condition. But Collin’s problems were not under his skin, they were in the system he was born in. 1 of 5 children, whose farmer parents are left with no option but to send him to a public school. Collins has missed most of the second school term for lack of school fees. 12000UGX per term! At the end of the day, I told Collins not to worry about school, because the God he had just prayed to, as the meeting closed, had answered his prayer for school fees for the rest of his primary school education. After 1 day, and 1 prayer, at least in Collins’ eyes, there is hope.

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